| in the land of wicked women |

UPDATE

 Women of Note is growing up. We’re in the process of transitioning from baby bloggie to full-on functioning website. This will involve a bit of rebranding. 

Firstly, we’ll be changing our name to Lola Novella. The switch is based on a few things; one being that the original title simply feels dated. Forward-thinking feminism involves commending women more inclusively within society, not just for their success amongst women. Though this was (obvs) never our intent, you can see how the title could allude to such. We aim to celebrate great human character + stories that can further illustrate the capacity of women in a non-preachy or overly academic way.

 Also, Lola Novella is the penname of the writer/founder of the site, and she is tired of this confusing tirade of typing in third person. Thinks she might be contracting some kind of personality disorder because of it. Looking forward to sharing the new and improved site.

Thanks, guyz. 
lplp

the perfect day. reasons to live alone. #ideals #champagne #tea #crumpets #turban #sunshine #lonertimes #poshasfuck
the perfect day. reasons to live alone. #ideals #champagne #tea #crumpets #turban #sunshine #lonertimes #poshasfuck

the perfect day. reasons to live alone. #ideals #champagne #tea #crumpets #turban #sunshine #lonertimes #poshasfuck

Yes to the FKA Twigs train.

Karen O has released her first tidbit from her debut solo album, Crush Songs, due for release in September. The song + video is called ‘Rapt’, and it’s a soft and gentle ballad perfect for daydreaming about your current person of interest.

"When I was 27, I crushed a lot," she says. "I didn’t think I’d ever fall in love again. These songs were written and recorded in private around this time. They are the soundtrack to what was an ever continuing love crusade. I hope they keep you company on yours."

Boy oh boy, I think I’m going through this phase at the moment. Lots of fast crushes here and there followed by the fizzle. O well. Looking forward to this lil life soundtrack from one of the top ladies in the business of popular music… xx

INTERVIEW  |  HELLO, MONICA ADAIR

A weathered old man on a mountaintop; a grand-scaled ship sailing dark seas when the world was still flat; straight-up John Smith from Pocahontas (hashtag disneykidd)– what do you think of when you hear the word explorer? The word itself carries connotations of a time long passed– an archived title reserved for history books and newfound land– but with the advancement of time and its ages, it seems fair that the term carries forward, too.

 Enter: Monica Adair. She’s an architect by trade, but her heart is set on more. “We can make a path,” she says, “but things come up and it rarely becomes that path. My team and I, we like to think of ourselves as explorers– explorers in the sense of people who, even though they don’t know where they’re going, they still have a path. It’s this idea of taking some chartered courses and then looking for unchartered territory as well; a mixing of strict guidelines and open discovery. It’s a life journey, and that’s the kind of life I want to live.”

 As co-founder of Acre Architects, Monica alongside her husband + business partner, Stephen Kopp, make up 2 of just 11 architects under the age of 40 operating out of New Brunswick. Their uptown abode in the port city of Saint John is designed more as an artist studio than an office space– its lofty, industrial accents mingle with warm woods, wall-to-wall bookshelves, and–– oh –– a self-built treehouse (sans the tree) “mini office”. The ‘house is Monica’s personal headquarters– a wee nook lit with art, sentimental tokens, and her own collection of antique typewriters.

  In the Acre office, egos are checked at the door. Monica’s small team of six thrives on the philosophy of ‘believing you can live a better life’. It’s a simple yet effective idea that carries their group narrative while they work on both raising the bar of their home-base city and taking on projects worldwide. The two bosses tend to float between Saint John and their New York City office, where they’re currently working on a boutique hotel in Brooklyn. It’s not about being a big fish in a small pond for them– it’s a balance between making a difference in their east coast Canadian city and keeping acclimatized to whatever else comes their way.

  A lot of the work Monica and her team do is about connecting– not in the social networking schmooze-ster way. “We want to make every single thing we do count– I just don’t want to leave this world without making some kind of difference. Each project we take on means something to us– that’s essential,” she says.

  One of their recent projects involves no building of buildings at all– Monica and Stephen teamed up with a group of prominent artists, intellects,  and cultural disrupters in NY to shoot a video documentary based around acts of giving & creating meaning. It’s the type of project that parallels with their openminded and heavy-heart attitude in work and life. (Stay tuned on more about this project– I am dying talk more details and share the neat folks involved.)

 “Architecture is a means to do some of the things that are important to me,” Monica says, “More importantly it’s the how and the chance of discovering what’s out there– something that’s bigger than what I know today.”

 Read on as I talk with Monica about her own essence of life, maintaining, and being a “moon family”. If this whole architecture gig doesn’t pan out, she’s got a backup career in the spirit-guide department.

What’s been the base of your coming to form?

I’ve never taken the conventional order of things as a given. Having a strong family helps– my mother was a human rights activist, an immigrant, and the oldest of 18 children. My father was an entrepreneur. Stephen [husband] and I always come back to this analogy of rolling with the storm– life as this whirlpool where the more you struggle to fight it, the deeper down you go. Trying to just go around things– moving with life and its challenges, and seeing where it takes you… life has been a lot of that for me.

 What’s that like– working professionally with your husband / love?

Even-Stephen. He’s basically riding over top of the storm while I run through it. I learn a lot from him. He likes to be underestimated, whereas I am the opposite. We met in architecture school followed by biding for the same job. They ended up giving the job to both of us, so we got an apartment together in Brooklyn, and I realized I could work with him early on. I’m not sure what his answer to that question would be. [laughs]

 Yes, I can just imagine a family portrait commission of you, Stephen, and baby Hugo riding through this figurative ‘storm’. Stephen flying cool-calm overtop, you riding straight through it, and baby Hugo…. Hugo could the moon, maybe.

Ah, the moon. Hugo would love to be the moon– “where did moon go?” he says. We are very much a moon family.

 Oh?

Okay. So, the sun–it’s fine. We change our lives based on it; we move our daily calendars to it. We go to bed based on it, and it’s easy because it’s daily. But, the moon– which changes entire tides and has incredible force– we kind of just bypass it and think, “oh, it’s the moon”. It has so much pull, and the earth is so much water, how can it not affect us? My father always said his best business decisions were made on a full moon, and so my family has always been and still is very tied and responsive to it. It makes me feel very small on the planet, but in a very good way– how it makes me feel relative to the world’s rawest, biggest fundamentals.

I would like to also be a moon person now, thanku. Can you tell me who is someone you admire? Curious who Monica Adair looks up to.

I’m more moved by actions than people themselves– moments that make you want to weep. People who can be big in the face of fear or vulnerable in times when life sets challenges– we’re defined more by actions than anything. I guess I just admire those Vikings– those people are brave enough to put themselves out there to take pleasure and experience things, and realize the world’s power. There’s so much to take in and I want to experience it all– I want to ache in this world because I love it so much. People who can really put themselves out there to approximate that are what drive me.

 And how do you maintain this very full life– family, your own firm, big work projects, travel, Hugo– all while keeping it so rich?

I’m inspired a lot. I try to surround myself with artists and creative people to keep things lush, and I feel very lucky to have those people around me. Though, I’ve always liked the quote “Inspiration is for amateurs”. My inspiration is about creating a process to facilitate that. Architecture is one of those means of doing so.

What about the little things on the daily? Eg: routines and art and books and things?

These days, I spend my running time listening to audiobooks - this week’s run has me diving into the illustrious and gripping lives of Polar Explorers (makes my running seem laughably easy in comparison). I also like scotch. And bourbon. I get really into things in the moment, and so I’m constantly throwing myself into things… that’s how I thrive to my fullest. 

Does a baby city like Saint John satisfy the ACRE’s creative quench?

I’ve always been strong in believing that you don’t have to live in a big city to make big things. Stephen and I talked about how we probably only have about 40 great projects left in our life, as good architecture takes time. We’re invested in making a difference here in our own piece of the world without tying ourselves to Saint John exclusively. I’m don’t tend to be tied to “a place” itself– the people, yes– but I prefer to remain unbound. It’s a way to make room for the mysterious and wonderful. Why limit that?

Word to that. Thank u, M.

Thank u, L.

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Here at Women of Note, you can count on us (and by “us” i mean “me”… a lone cat named laura) to give you the latest on the hottest, dopest lezzy couples out there. It’s our contribution to CELEBRITY, okay? It’s fun. We love dope ladies with dope ladies, and so should everybody.
This is about a week old in internet land, and I apologize ‘cuz I said I’d be on the cusp, but I’ve been busy moving. Sorry about that. Anywho, Angel Haze has been on my rotation for some time now, and I love her skillz / poetic prowess, and I extra love her ‘tude with the media’s whole speculation of she and Baldwin getting “friendly”, and just straightup beating around the bush (#punz4U) with the validity of a genuine girlfriend-girlfriend relationship. And an interracial one, at that– shitttt! Says Haze:

"We f—- and friends don’t f—-. I have never f——d one of my friends. Once I see you in that way, it doesn’t happen.
I don’t know if there’s like some confirm or deny thing with the way relationships work in the media but everyone just calls us best friends, best friends for life, like we’re just friends hanging out. An interracial gay couple? I mean, that’s just weird for America right now.”



On a side note, not sure what Baldwin’s deal is… hopefully she’s not a raging dick like her Dad. Better treat Angel right, ya know?
 
Here at Women of Note, you can count on us (and by “us” i mean “me”… a lone cat named laura) to give you the latest on the hottest, dopest lezzy couples out there. It’s our contribution to CELEBRITY, okay? It’s fun. We love dope ladies with dope ladies, and so should everybody.
This is about a week old in internet land, and I apologize ‘cuz I said I’d be on the cusp, but I’ve been busy moving. Sorry about that. Anywho, Angel Haze has been on my rotation for some time now, and I love her skillz / poetic prowess, and I extra love her ‘tude with the media’s whole speculation of she and Baldwin getting “friendly”, and just straightup beating around the bush (#punz4U) with the validity of a genuine girlfriend-girlfriend relationship. And an interracial one, at that– shitttt! Says Haze:

"We f—- and friends don’t f—-. I have never f——d one of my friends. Once I see you in that way, it doesn’t happen.
I don’t know if there’s like some confirm or deny thing with the way relationships work in the media but everyone just calls us best friends, best friends for life, like we’re just friends hanging out. An interracial gay couple? I mean, that’s just weird for America right now.”



On a side note, not sure what Baldwin’s deal is… hopefully she’s not a raging dick like her Dad. Better treat Angel right, ya know?
 

Here at Women of Note, you can count on us (and by “us” i mean “me”… a lone cat named laura) to give you the latest on the hottest, dopest lezzy couples out there. It’s our contribution to CELEBRITY, okay? It’s fun. We love dope ladies with dope ladies, and so should everybody.

This is about a week old in internet land, and I apologize ‘cuz I said I’d be on the cusp, but I’ve been busy moving. Sorry about that. Anywho, Angel Haze has been on my rotation for some time now, and I love her skillz / poetic prowess, and I extra love her ‘tude with the media’s whole speculation of she and Baldwin getting “friendly”, and just straightup beating around the bush (#punz4U) with the validity of a genuine girlfriend-girlfriend relationship. And an interracial one, at that– shitttt! Says Haze:


"We f—- and friends don’t f—-. I have never f——d one of my friends. Once I see you in that way, it doesn’t happen.

I don’t know if there’s like some confirm or deny thing with the way relationships work in the media but everyone just calls us best friends, best friends for life, like we’re just friends hanging out. An interracial gay couple? I mean, that’s just weird for America right now.”

On a side note, not sure what Baldwin’s deal is… hopefully she’s not a raging dick like her Dad. Better treat Angel right, ya know?

 

Ah, one of my favourites from Emma Ruth Rundle. It’s a smooth remix of her acoustic ballad “Shadows of My Name”, but if your new to her work, y’all probably know this woman can seriously shred a g-tar. Her other musical projects (which appear to be on hold as she focuses on solo pursuits) include the largely instrumental post-rock band Marriages and the similarly-minded Red Sparows. Imagine metal meets dreamscapes on top of some prickly female vocals.

I met Rundle last year at a gig she played with Bosnian Rainbows at The Mod Club in Toronto and certainly had my fan-girl moment. At the time, she was just finishing her Marriages tour and looking forward to breaking away for solo explorations and emphasis on her work as a visual artist. Soft spoken and noteably articulate in her stance as an artist and general being, I’m pleased to see her solo projects come to light.

Her album is available on Vinyl or cd on her website.


x

I figured I should share the Animalia album I’ve been posting so much about (well, two posts) here on la blogge– you can stream the entire thing for free and it’s super lovely. Hopefully the music video didn’t freak you out too much! Don’t be skerred….

I’m loving the soft ballad of a track “Forgotten”. It’s a bone-chiller and shift from the rest of the album’s more uptempo electro grooves. Her cover of Hush Money’s “Space Penetration 2000” is pretty rad, too– a song that was originally a hiphop tune. Generallly speaking, the whole album is solid head-bopping times, and with that certain melancholy Animalia does so well. (emotional tumblr kids are gonna eat this sh*t UP) 

Enjoy!

INTERVIEW | For the Love of Music w/ Animalia

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(Photo by Jenny Bundock)

It’s been a while since I’ve spoken to Animalia– also known as Jill Krasnicki– about her music, and 2014 has proved itself a pivotal year for her stance as an indie artist. The 29-year old Aussie has been quietly building a life for herself in Toronto for close to 6 years now, but her journey as a musician has been a much longer and winded road, one that she tried and failed to give up many times.

This year, between navigating a coffee addiction and her ever-increasing number of household animals (mostly cats and fostered babes), she’s spent her time escaping comfort zones and breaking down the elements of herself as a working artist. Her drive to understand the industry and engage with a greater audience was the push she needed to set aside loner tendencies, and in what’s only been a matter of months, she’s created a new indie record label with friend and doom rapper, Garbageface, released her debut full-length album (Mouth Full of Teeth), and rocked a slew of exciting performances to include a collaborative effort with the amazing Sook Yin Lee, all before hitting the road for an Ontario-wide tour this month. The brand new video for the album’s first single, Stifling (see yesterday’s post), is the suiting accompaniment to her dimly-lit, emotive style of electronic grooves.

 Read on as I talk to Animalia about the business side of music, her new indie label, and her artistic inclinations.

—-

What’s 2014 been like for you?

It’s been really cool. I started 2014 finishing up the album and making plans for the release. So much has changed from the start of the year to now. At the start of the year I felt pretty alone in this music journey but now I’m starting to feel like I have a bit of a team growing. The indie label, Killjoy Collective, I started with my friend Karol Orzechowski (aka Garbageface) has been a big part of that.

What’s the idea behind the new album, Mouth Full of Teeth?

It’s centered on the concept of feeling frustrated. Frustrated with my music, my life, the world I live in. Some songs are very personal and are about things that actually happened, whereas other songs are about how I feel due to certain worldly topics, like animal cruelty, or the destruction of the natural world.

I’m always curious about the songwriting process for artists. What’s yours like?

I tend to write pretty fast, which worked out well in this case. I had originally planned to do a half electronic – half acoustic album, but as it approached recording time I just wasn’t feeling the acoustic stuff anymore. So I sat down and wrote pretty much the entire album in two months.

What comes first varies. Sometimes it’s a bass line, a beat or the vocal melody. I spend endless hours creating the music on Logic and when the song is complete, I send it to Remy Perrin and he adds his special touch: nice effects, better sounding instruments. We also record the vocals at his studio together.

Now that I’m electronic a lot of people ask, “Who makes your beats?”- I do. I do everything! I am very fussy about what my music sounds like. Very little changes – as in structure and feel – when Remy producers my music. But my original versions sound very 1 dimensional. He adds a lot of depth and riches to the sounds.

 Why do you create?

Cause I can’t not create. I tried to give up music so many times. I didn’t want to do music anymore. It was just an endless struggle. But every time I gave it up, I got so miserable and then really inspired and then the next thing I know, I was making music again.

 Who do you depend on as an artist and how so/why?

There’s no one I really depend on as an artist. It’s always been such an introverted thing. Obviously there are people in my life that help me, either musically or just to keep me sane, but my music is a solo journey thus far.

 Can you tell me about your work ethic?

Obsessive. I can’t stop moving, or thinking, or doing. It drives me crazy. I can’t just sit back and relax. Something interesting has to be happening at all times other wise I get really bored.

Any music-related regrets?

The biggest thing I regret is not diving into the “business” end of music earlier. When you’re young you think you’re music will just get magically discovered and everything will work out. But, especially now with so many artists, you really got to work hard at getting your music discovered. There’s no “right” way of doing it, so it’s something that takes a lot of time. I’m still working so much out.

It’s a tough sport. How do you survive?

I make music I want to hear. Because then if no one else listens to it, at least I get to enjoy it. There’s so little guarantees in music and so many disappointments – shitty shows, no press attention – but that’s the way it goes. The only way to survive as any artist, I think, is to have a bit of a “fuck you, I do what I want” attitude.

How do you feel about social media? Is it important for a new / upcoming artist?

It’s definitely important because the internet exists and that’s the world we live in now. The internet is both a blessing and a curse. Because of the internet I can reach thousands of people I would never be able to reach otherwise. But because it’s so accessible and music is so easy to make now, everyone is reaching out to everyone. So it’s a complete mess. 

Your new music video is directed by Brandon Cronenberg. What was your idea behind it?

It’s for a song called Stifling, the first song off the album, and the song is probably the most intense song on the album. We wanted to do something very visual that expresses the sort of frustrated, intense energy the song is written around. We’ve got a few camera tricks in there, as well as some really interesting lighting. It was shot by Karim Hussain (DP for Hobo with a Shotgun, Antiviral), so the visuals are definitely somewhat unsettling.

What’s your favourite kind of dinosaur?

Definitely a diplodocus. All those really big, leaf-eating dinosaurs are amazing.

L O L  L O L  L O L.

Amy Schumer takes a crack at the ol’ political scandal smooth-over– you know, the scenario that’s been historically occupied by powerful professional white men who, after a series of unsuccessful diffusion strategies, must publicly come to face their indiscretions. Flipping the switch to a woman’s take on this is pretty funny, especially with the whole “slut-shaming” epidemic that’s become a catelogue of conversation in itself.

 Thank goodness for her “beautiful husband”—  standing by her side through this extremely stressful ordeal. Amaze.

No Lana No

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Jezebel reported some of Lana Del Ray’s thoughts on feminism yesterday. Real facepalm-type sh^t. She was likely trying to come across hip and intelligent– traits which require convincing if you’re a pop artist wanting the street credz– but she ended up coming off as a tad dim. Apparently she has no interest in feminism, and she’d rather discuss things like OUTERSPACE. Quotes Rolling Stone: 

"For me, the issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept… Whenever people bring up feminism, I’m like, god. I’m just not really that interested." She went on to say, "I’m more interested in, you know, SpaceX and Tesla, what’s going to happen with our intergalactic possibilities."

How many more celebrities do we have to hear misconstrue feminism? You don’t have to sit around with your butches reciting Simone de Beauvoir to be a feminist. It’s not an activity. the only real thing required of “the feminist” is having a very basic, very general awareness of men and women not having equality in every aspect of society, and that you think it’s shitty.

Get wid it, lana. (i’ll still bop to her tunes, obvs.)

END RANT.

Animalia’s debut album, Mouth Full of Teeth, came out today, and it’s accompanied by a creepy new video for the album’s first single, “Stifling”.

Directed by Brandon Cronenberg, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the visuals would bend towards the raw and macabre side of things (though, she’s no stranger to the weirdness, herself). Behold, as tight shots of manipulated moving flesh set forth a chain of bold color flashes, silhouettes, and oozing bodily fluids. Girl’z got that whole “strange and I like it and oh ya I’m not going to rest on being pretty in a scenic field while you finish watching my music video” thing going on. 

Her skin is crawling, your skin is crawling– it’s the most physical internet experience you’ll have this week. Well done, Animalia. Props to B on the master accompaniment to a sweet beat of a song, too (an honorary woman of note).

Enjoy, and stay tuned for tomorrow when I post our interview. 

Word!

This song on repeat.

LOVE HER. LOVE IT ALL.

On Beauty Ideals w/ model Jessica Lewis

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Jessica Lewis’ evolution through the fashion industry is a testament to intuition. The twenty-eight year old beauty returned to the scene just a year ago after breaking from her 10-year career as an international muse, and it’s on her own terms that she’s hitting career peaks like never before.

  Trotting down runways throughout Europe and Asia doesn’t exactly represent the average adolescent experience, but when it comes to societal image and beauty ideals, Jessica grew up in the belly of the beast. Scouted as a model at the age of 15, she was privy to an industry with extra hardnosed views on image. Within the working-model world, girls considered ideal were sometimes the ones passing out from exhaustion on set. If this was happening inside the industry, what was happening on the outside? The message being relayed to women of the world was enough to make her take a step back.

 It was at this point when Jess quit the business cold turkey and set off on a solo six-week expedition through the Camino Santiago to have her own Eat, Pray, Love experience of sorts. If anything, this was a chance to connect with herself in a way her lifestyle hadn’t previously allowed. After the Camino, Jess settled into her hometown of Toronto for the first time in over a decade. She found a bartending job at a local raw veg restaurant while prioritizing time to relax, refresh, eat, exercise, socialize, and generally cultivate her life force. 

When her agent approached her about plus modeling, a year had passed and the opportunity felt right. The world of plus has truly bloomed over the past few years, allowing luscious babes over the sample size a platform to project a healthier body image for women. While Jessica is not a large woman, her sultry size 8-12 (yep, models fluctuate, too) figure is classified as ‘plus’ as far as fashion standards go.

Her dress size isn’t the message, though– diversity is. She knows that skinny women are entitled to insecurities as much as the next gal, and is geared more towards the promotion of quality of life. Being bogged down about your butt is no way to go through the world, ya know?

 It hasn’t taken long for Jess to gain momentum again. Since returning as a plus, she’s shot for publications like Interview, Vogue (Elena Miro), C-Heads (incredible shoot by Cameron Davis here), and– this month’s issue– PLAYBOY. Just over the past few weeks, she’s worked with legendary photographers like Kenneth Willardt and Antoine Verglas, who were key players when it came to idealizing the image of a curvy body in the 90’s. Think: Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, Pamela Anderson. Oh my.

Read on as I talk to Jessica more about fashion, beauty ideals, where she’s at, and her decision behind posing for Playboy:  

________

You’ve been labeled “the comeback kid” for 2014. What’s it been like being back in the industry?

Lots of shoots wearing different hats as model, creative director, producer, and advocate. It’s definitely been a lot of firsts for me. I got back into modeling as a plus model, which brought me into doing advocacy work surrounding diversity in the industry. I also stepped on board at GLASSbook as their Creative Director. It’s great because all my jobs right now kind of feed and compliment each other. GLASSbook has been amazing with introducing me to the world of art and sub-cultures which in turn has brought more attention to my advocacy work. I’m realizing just how influential and supportive these underground cultures are becoming to mainstream fashion. Makes me stoked on the next few years.

What’s your mindset this time around?

I feel like now I know the industry on many levels, not just that of a model, which makes me more understanding of the creative process as a whole. Also, you know that older, wiser saying? It’s true. 

It must be somewhat empowering approaching the industry on your own terms– how true is the talk about dieting extremes in model life?

I mean, any model that started at a young age will have stories. I won’t BS– extreme dieting, drugs– it’s all true. Though, if you have a solid pair of balls you’ll chalk everything up to experience and translate it into something positive.

Are body image and beauty ideals improving in fashion?

Progress is being made. Girls with curves are becoming a more prominent fixture in mainstream media and high fashion. 

The thing is some girls are naturally skinny, some aren’t. It’s pretty cut and dry, or it should be. I don’t think the industry should have just one or the other. Be yourself, be healthy, and if modeling was meant for you, it will happen, cause it sucks being in Paris and not being able to eat a croissant.

You’re a big advocate for female nudity. Give me some perspective.

I think the female form is gorgeous. There’s just something very powerful about a woman who can be confident and happy in her body when she has no clothes to cover any areas she may not feel good about.

For me, I started doing nudes because as I got into the plus industry I realized that plus or straight size, women still relied on clothing and makeup to be completely happy and confident in themselves or, that’s the image that the industry projects, which has brought up a lot of questions when it comes to societies standards of beauty, the whole what’s real and what’s not debate.

So it’s about stripping down (literally and figuratively, ha) and embracing the radiance that comes naturally with confidence…. ? 

Very good. Yes– I wanted to put a raw image and be very transparent for women to see just the person when she’s not being a model. My nudes are very lightly retouched, oftentimes I’m not wearing makeup, and don’t have my hair done. If you look really close you’ll see stretch marks or cellulite. I wouldn’t call myself an extremist in any regard– I work out twice a week, eat healthy, drink on occasion, have a healthy sex life, and all these things combined give me confidence. Some women give me props for empowering them, others tell me to put my clothes on. Oh well.

You shot for June’s issue of Playboy. Some may question: how is this a positive message for women?

Playboy is an awesome publication. Honestly, I think people don’t know the story behind the publication and the man, Hugh Hefner. He has done wonderful things for women’s rights and racial equality over the years. Until very recently, yes, Playboy was the go to for the spank bank, however since porn in so readily available these days for free they’ve changed their aesthetic up a bit. There are still naked women, but it’s not vulgar as it used to be. 

What do you want to see change for women?

I’d like to see the industry really diversify itself size and ethnicity wise. I think we’re at that point in the evolution of not just our industry, but society where it’s important to project images that speak to everyone.

 I suppose you’re able to piggyback your advocacy work between modeling and your role as the CD of GLASSbook?

Definitely. I help our Editor-In-Chief, Jasmine, comb through and evaluate the content we are going to put in the magazine. I also conceptualize and produce shoots for the magazine; this means sourcing our talent, location scouting, making post shoot selects… that kind of thing. Since GLASSbook is bi-annual we don’t concern ourselves too much with trends and just publish what we see as amazing creative images. This means we love publishing projects that can provide added context to popular culture and roll against the grain. 

Describe the industry through your eyes.

It’s a very tight knit community and I know many people who aren’t in the industry perceive us as nuts… it’s fashion. It’s not for the faint of heart. It’s shocking, repulsive and will anger you sometimes, other times its beautiful, romantic and fantastic. It’s an emotional roller coaster and never lacking in drama. To be honest I think all those emotions happen to your average person in their life too…we just manage to cram them into one day instead.

Very Good, then.

Very Good.